Category Archives: Children

9 of the Best STEM Books for Young Adults

9 of the Best STEM Books for Young Adults

One way that parents can involve themselves in their children’s learning in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) is to provide access to necessary resources, such as books. For parents looking for a selection of quality STEM books, the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) nominates a number of young adult nonfiction books for its annual Award for Excellence in Nonfiction, and some of these books feature STEM-related themes.

The following is a list of recent YALSA Nonfiction Award nominees, finalists, and winners—all relevant to STEM—by year.

 

2018

eyesoftheworldEyes of the World: Robert Capa, Gerda Taro, and the Invention of Modern Photojournalism, written by Marc Aronson and Marina Budhos, was a finalist for the Nonfiction Award. The book tells the story of two photojournalists who worked to document the Spanish Civil War, which was a fight against fascism and a forerunner to WWII. In this book, students can learn about how camera and film technologies played a role in shaping awareness of world events.

 

2017

Nonfiction Award nominee Sachiko: A Nagasaki Bomb Survivor’s Story, written by Caren Stelson, tells the real-life story of a girl who survived the WWII nuclear bombing by the United States of the Japanese city of Nagasaki. Youth interested in the health sciences will find in this book a tale of both the physical and mental health effects of nuclear war.

 

2016

Nancy Plains This Strange Wilderness: The Life and Art of John James Audubon, a Nonfiction Award nominee, uses the journals and letters of John James Audubon to tell the story of one of the first—and also one of the most famous—naturalists in the United States. Any student interested in the natural sciences will be impressed by Audubon’s attention to detail in his effort to document every bird on the American continent.

 

2015

eyeswideopenPaul Fleischman wrote Eyes Wide Open: Going Behind the Environmental Headlines, a 2015 nominee. Concerned about the death of a local bee population, the author embarks on an investigation into current global environmental problems. Climate change, fossil fuels, farming, pesticides, ocean health, and air quality are just a few of the topics a budding environmental scientist will find covered in this book.

 

2014

Russell Freedman’s Becoming Ben Franklin: How a Candle-Maker’s Son Helped Light the Flame of Liberty recounts the life of Benjamin Franklin, one of early America’s most well-known engineers. Famous for experimenting with wood stove designs, electricity, and the lightning rod, Benjamin Franklin is sure to inspire future engineers who read this book, a Nonfiction Award nominee.

 

2013

The winner of the 2013 YALSA Nonfiction Award, Bomb: The Race to Build—and Steal—the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon, by Steve Sheinkin, combines mystery, science, and history to share the story of how the first atomic bomb was built. Readers with an interest in nuclear science will be interested to learn how international competition and intrigue played a role in the scientific process.

 

2012

Sugar Changed the World: A Story of Magic, Spice, Slavery, Freedom, and Science, written by Marc Aronson and Marina Budhos, was a YALSA nonfiction award finalist. The book is primarily focused on sugar’s role in society throughout history, including the use of slave labor to harvest sugar cane. However, the authors explain that the scientific advancements involved in producing sugar substitutes were influential in changing the working conditions of those in the sugar industry. Youths interested in using science to solve social problems will surely find this book motivational.

 

2011

everybonetellsastoryEvery Bone Tells a Story: Hominin Discoveries, Deductions, and Debates, a YALSA finalist, was written by Jill Rubalcaba and Peter Robertshaw. This book focuses on the scientific fields of archaeology and paleontology as it explores the discovery and analysis of four sets of ancient fossil remains. Readers interested in pursuing any science discipline will be interested to learn about the debates that remain after applying the scientific method, as the book shows that sometimes the scientific process results in more questions than answers.

 

2010

Almost Astronauts: 13 Women Who Dared to Dream, written by Tanya Lee Stone, was a finalist for the YALSA Nonfiction Award in 2010, the first year this award was offered. Stone’s book tells the story of how a doctor at NASA in the 1960s wanted to know if women could pass the physical tests required to become an astronaut. He put a group of 13 women through the same procedures as the male potential astronauts, but no matter the results, women were not allowed to be astronauts at a time when only white men were authorized to fly into space. Aspiring space scientists, future health scientists, and those interested in women’s roles in STEM fields will find plenty to keep them engaged in this book.

Top Ranked K-12 STEM Programs in the United States

Top Ranked K-12 STEM Programs in the United States

Over the past few years, interest in improving education in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) has grown. One area of focus has been the role parents play in ensuring their children succeed in STEM education. But parents alone are not enough to make sure that children not only earn high marks… Continue Reading

How One Woman Is helping Girls of Color Learn about Technology

How One Woman Is helping Girls of Color Learn about Technology

A lot of attention has been paid in recent years to the employment gender gap in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. Presently, more men than women pursue and persist in careers in these areas. A similar employment gap in STEM fields exists for non-Asian minorities. For example, more whites and Asian minorities… Continue Reading

3 of the Best STEM Programs for High School Students Who Are Visually Impaired

3 of the Best STEM Programs for High School Students Who Are Visually Impaired

One troubling aspect about the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM)  field is its lack of diversity. Much attention is paid to the gender gap in STEM fields, as well as the underrepresentation of non-Asian minorities, but another important demographic to consider when diversifying the STEM workforce is people with disabilities. In fact, the National… Continue Reading

EHTP Benefit Gala Raises a Record $4 Million for Youth in Need

EHTP Benefit Gala Raises a Record $4 Million for Youth in Need

The East Harlem Tutorial Program (EHTP) hosted its 60th Anniversary Benefit on May 21, 2018, at New York City’s American Museum of Natural History. The annual gala honors those involved in EHTP’s mission to raise college graduation rates among East Harlem’s youth. This year’s gala raised $4 million and drew 600 guests, which are both… Continue Reading

Important Research on the Role Parents Play in Children’s STEM Success

Important Research on the Role Parents Play in Children’s STEM Success

Proficiency in STEM skills is seen as a key component for success in the 21st century workplace. Yet observers note an achievement gap in STEM education and careers, with white males leading the way and members of other groups falling behind. This issue is so troubling that the US Department of Education has set achieving… Continue Reading

13 Award-Winning STEM Picture Books for Young Children You Need to Know about

13 Award-Winning STEM Picture Books for Young Children You Need to Know about

Employment in STEM fields does not reflect the diversity of American society; white males in these fields outnumber women and non-Asian minorities. A report by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission explains that despite a growing number of high-tech job opportunities, it is mostly white males who are benefitting from this job growth, especially at… Continue Reading

A Look at the Student Programming at EHTP

A Look at the Student Programming at EHTP

Since its inception in 1958, the East Harlem Tutorial Program (EHTP) has promoted educational equality in the community of East Harlem, New York. The organization recognizes that the historic marginalization of those of different classes, races, and ages has given rise to inequalities in all facets of life. Within the realm of education, EHTP works… Continue Reading

5 of the Best Ways to Become Involved with EHTP

5 of the Best Ways to Become Involved with EHTP

Since its inception in 1958, the East Harlem Tutorial Program (EHTP) has expanded from a small children’s reading group and tutoring program into an organization that has transformed the lives of children from across the East Harlem area. Led by the driving core values of service, courage, humility, originality, leadership, achievement, and reflection (SCHOLAR), the… Continue Reading

How to Create an Effective STEM Lesson

How to Create an Effective STEM Lesson

As an advocate for STEM education, Phillips Charitable Organizations provides scholarships to help aspiring engineering professionals realize their dreams. The nonprofit is one of many organizations focused on the important goal of creating a thriving, diverse STEM pipeline in the United States. In doing so, philanthropists, educators, and STEM professionals are striving to not only… Continue Reading